centre d’art contemporain genève

IMAGE

MOUVEMENT

CINENOVA
WOMEN’S FILM AND VIDEO DISTRIBUTOR

A proposition by Emilie Bujès

≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈ For its first presentation in Switzerland, the feminist film and video organization CINENOVA will propose a programme in three chapters.

16.03 - 27.05.2012
4th Floor

≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈ The invitation of CINENOVA, extended within the framework of the IMAGE-MOUVEMENT platform, is part of ongoing research on film archives that was initiated in 2010 with a series of presentations and screenings entitled "Archive Fire. Between Memory and Open Territory". Beyond preservation and accessibility, these contemporary reappropriations of collected materials also offer the opportunity to reconsider the archive and – possibly – to "desediment" or deconstruct (Derrida), reform and question it.
CINENOVA, which owns of a large collection of films and videos made by women, offers an opportunity to reflect on the meanings of this very specific aspect, in the past and today: is there a different language, point of view, filmmaking process? The Working Group will present nine films and videos at the Centre, structured around three significant topics. They will also participate in a discussion in May, when they will talk about their position relative to that of their founders as well as their current struggles and future aims.

≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈ CINENOVA was founded in 1991 following the merger of two feminist film and video distributors, “Circles” and “Cinema of Women”. Each was formed in the early 1980s in response to the lack of recognition of women in the history of the moving image. Both organisations, although initially self-organised and unfunded, aimed to provide the means to support the production and distribution of women’s work in this area, and played critical roles in the creation of an independent and radical media. CINENOVA currently distributes over 500 titles that include experimental film, narrative feature films, artists’ film and video, documentary and educational videos made from the 1920s to the present. CINENOVA holds a large collection of paper materials, books and posters related to works it distributes, and the history and politics of film and video production. The thematics in the work at CINENOVA include oppositional histories, post-colonial struggles, domestic and care work, representation of gender and sexuality, and importantly, the relations and alliances between these different struggles.

PROGRAMME 1: REVEALING, NAMING, EXPOSING
16.03 – 08.04
≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈ One of the key issues of the feminist movement of the 1970s and 1980s was to question the concept of an objective position analysing and presenting the histories of others. Many women publicly denied being described from a male perspective, and instead researched and presented oppositional histories. In the field of film and video production, they aimed to explore other visual languages and give voice to their own ideas and desires. The film-makers presented in this programme investigate in different ways, how a story can be told while being aware of their own involvement in these stories, whether they become visible with the body, the camera movement, their family’s background, or an uncompromising political engagement.

RONNA BLOOM, “I Feel Hopeful About the Future”, UK, 1986, video, 11’
SU FRIEDRICH, “The Ties That Bind”, USA, 1984, 16mm transferred to video, 55’
SANDRA LAHIRE, “Uranium Hex”, UK, 1987, 16mm transferred to video, 11’

PROGRAMME 2: THESE RELATIONSHIPS AND ROOMS
10.04 – 6.05
≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈ These rooms house these relationships. Unlike a situation comedy or melodrama, the relationships are not a nuclear family, they do not live there in the sense of creating a home, but there are lives there. In “Keep Your Laws Off My Body”, lovers make out, but intercut their bodies, in spaces of protest, as part of the ACT UP protest in 1989. “17 Rooms” is a serial sequence of vignettes, Dykes in bed, with projections of their sexuality in diagrams, fantasies from outside the room, overlay the everyday sharing, making activity that can also happen in bed. “Space Invaders” goes to a nightclub, and ends up in a bedroom, behind a TV, where layers of alienation are set between the protagonist and our viewing.

ZOE LEONARD and CATHERINE SAALFIELD, “Keep Your Laws Off My Body”, USA, 1990, Super 8 transferred to video, 13’
CAROLINE SHELDON, “17 Rooms (or what do lesbians do in bed?)”, UK, 1985, 16mm transferred to video, 10’
JUDITH BARRY, “Space Invaders”, USA, 1982, video, 8’

PROGRAMME 3: THE LIVING WE ARE IN
8.05 – 27.05
≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈ There are different degrees of othering that are occurring on each tape, arriving in a new place - and where violent race, gender and class intersections administered through cultural and political institutions impact life as liveable. Punk and vocal experimental sound by the punk band, Disband in “Hey Mack” runs similar rhythms to the edits and charge of “Now Pretend”. The film-makers are at the intersection, holding some sort of ground from which to speak of personal experiences, next to a broader critique of the position they are in. “Who Takes The Rap”, holds many voices and experiences, that offer history as a method to activate or make sense of the accumulation into present repression, and exploitation of immigrant works in the UK.

TINA KEANE, “Hey Mack”, UK, 1982, Super 8 transferred to video 15’
LEAH GILLIAM, “Now Pretend”, USA, 1991, 16mm transferred to video, 10’
LAI NGAN WALSH, “Who Takes The Rap – Immigration”, UK, 1986, video, 38’

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CHARLOTTE

MOTH

FILM

PROGRAMME

ON MONITORS

ELECTRONIC

ARTS

FORUM

IMAGE≈≈≈≈

MOUVEMENT 2011

IMAGE≈≈≈≈

MOUVEMENT 2010

THE SCREEN FROM

BARCELONA/LOOP FAIR